A Guide to Human Resource Management
Human Resource Management pertains to the field of HR that concerns itself with the recruitment, selection, management, and development of people in the workplace. In this sense, Human Resource Management is a branch of management that aims to optimize the organization's productive capacity by ensuring that human capital is developed through comprehensive human resource planning, […]

Human Resource Management pertains to the field of HR that concerns itself with the recruitment, selection, management, and development of people in the workplace. In this sense, Human Resource Management is a branch of management that aims to optimize the organization's productive capacity by ensuring that human capital is developed through comprehensive human resource planning, while simultaneously minimizing organization costs and effectively managing labor relations. HRM is also associated with labor relations because it addresses issues such as work-related health and safety, worker compensation, and other concerns pertaining to occupational health and safety. Other topics include training, developmental goals and objectives, workforce planning, quality assessment, and recruitment. The breadth of topics covered in this branch of HR management is practically endless, and human resource activities are continuously evolving to address new challenges and needs.

Human Resource Management studies four key policy areas. Comprehensive employee influence deals with the task of delegating right and responsibility for business objectives, salary, work schedules, job security, promotion and recognition, and other issues pertinent to organizational objectives. Reward systems are systems that are used to increase an individual's incentive to maintain good performance and enhance motivation. Work systems deal with the organization's work practices, and they include tasks, processes, and materials that are necessary to perform organizational activities.

The topics covered in this HR management publication are extensive, but we will discuss only a few of the many important issues. Among the many recommendations made in this publication are the following: human resource management departments should have their own separate staff sxt (people resource trainer). Staff sxt should be trained in the areas relevant to their job responsibilities. All staff must be evaluated periodically to ensure their continued growth and development. Regular staff meetings should be held to discuss work problems, new challenges, and employee rewards and incentives.