Evaluating Your Employee Recruitment Strategy
An employee recruitment strategy is basically defined as a customized, well-thought-out action plan to efficiently and effectively identify talent pools, bring suitable candidates onboard and then promote those talent pools to existing and potential customers. Also known as an applicant tracking system or an HR outsourcing strategy, it's not just a one-time program for a […]

An employee recruitment strategy is basically defined as a customized, well-thought-out action plan to efficiently and effectively identify talent pools, bring suitable candidates onboard and then promote those talent pools to existing and potential customers. Also known as an applicant tracking system or an HR outsourcing strategy, it's not just a one-time program for a single case or process. Instead, it's an integrated system that strives to achieve and maintain an overall objective - to effectively find, hire and promote employees - in the most cost-effective way. This means streamlining HR processes and maximizing employee engagement, while cutting unnecessary labor costs and reducing paperwork. An employee recruitment strategy can also reduce recruiting costs by focusing on a pool of qualified candidates from a pool of applicants who've applied for the same position.

But an employee recruitment strategy doesn't just stand alone. Rather, it needs to be tied-up with an effective hiring management system that supports it. In essence, your best talent won't be found unless you have a system in place to find, assess and recruit them. Ultimately, the success of your recruiting efforts depends on your ability to partner with the right hiring authorities and to leverage their expertise. It also relies on your ability to use your talent pools effectively.

There are many ways to evaluate your employee recruitment strategy's effectiveness. For example, ask yourself if your approach is providing the best possible candidates for the jobs you're trying to fill. If you're hiring a new full-time position in marketing, do you need someone with sales experience, or are you better off with someone who's a marketing specialist with sales experience?